Thursday, November 23, 2017

Happy Thanksgiving 2017

I hope everyone has a great day.

Thursday, August 24, 2017

Link: How to Buy Great Suits on eBay for Nothing by Jeffrey Tucker

This article has a lot of useful information.

My closet is full of Brooks Brothers, Polo Ralph Lauren and Southwick suits and sport coats (as well as some from other brands) from eBay. None had any visible wear. All of my suits cost around $55 each (around $50 seems to be most guys' price ceiling), maybe $100 each after alterations. It's beyond me why anyone would buy some trendy, glued-together piece of junk suit from the likes of Kohl's when they could get something 10x better quality for less money.

My only quibble is the note on lapel size. This should be determined by proportionality, not by the whims of fashion. A width of about 3 1/2 inches never goes out of style (for notch lapels on single-breasted jackets; peaked lapels on double-breasteds can be up to about five inches).

The 3 1/2 inch rule also applies to ties.

Regardless, I'm pleased to see that Tucker is still fighting the good fight. There aren't many of us left.

Thursday, August 3, 2017

Target retiring its "Merona" brand

The news is that Target is retiring its "Merona" brand, presumably soon. 

I've recommended their Merona polos before; they're 100% cotton, logo-less, and with tails (the longer back half helps a polo stay tucked in, and the slit between the front and back makes it more comfortable tucked or untucked). They're an amazing value at their usual retail price of about $13, and an insane value on sale (I picked up two more earlier this summer when they were only $7). 

My only complaint is inconsistent sizing, so try them on before you buy.  

I plan to hit Target in the next few days to see if they're on clearance, and I recommend that everyone else do the same. 

Hopefully they'll release another polo at least as good, just under a different name. 

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Are Your Straw Hats Ready?

I saw this on Facebook tonight, and it reminded me that Memorial Day is this Monday, the unquestioned start of the summer clothing season, which includes straw hats. 

One-hundred years ago (and much more recently), Straw Hat Day was an official thing, often proclaimed by the mayor of a given town sometime in April; often it was either May 1 or May 15, but sometimes as early as Easter (especially in the South, where the weather warms sooner). 

But no-one will question that it's okay to wear things like straw hats (and white bucks, seersucker, etc.) on Memorial Day and after. (Although apparently a May 20, 1908 editorial in the New York Times pegged Straw Hat Day as June 15.)  

Unfortunately, wearing any type of dress hat in 2017, especially with a suit, will cause many to look at you askance, so don't obsess over this stuff too much; it's mostly arcane historical trivia at this point. 

But don't wear your straw hat until Monday. 😀

Thursday, March 9, 2017

1920 Brooks Brothers in 2035

Clothing nerds like me and the people who read a blog like this often lament the changes at institutions like Brooks Brothers (despite those changes occurring before many of us were born) -- and the extinctions of others (which makes it worth noting that Brooks' changes may be why it is not also extinct). 

Anyway, I'm also a nerd for technology. 

Those of you who aren't may not know that we're probably less than 10 years away from custom, 3-D printed clothes (and most everything else) at near-zero cost. 

We're also probably less than 20 years away from full-immersion virtual-reality, which means we'll have blood-cell-sized robots in our bloodstreams that can shut down the signals coming into our central nervous systems from real reality, and replace them with signals from virtual reality -- which means virtual-reality will be indistinguishable from real reality. (Virtual-reality headsets like the Oculus Rift are primitive [but awesome by today's standards] precursors to this, like Pong was to, say, Battlefield 1.)


A video game in 1975 vs. a video game in 2016.

 






Moore's Law illustrated by the evolution of the Lara Croft character from each new edition (every two years) of the "Tomb Raider" game from 1996-2014.

Well, it just occurred to me that we'll likely not only be able to walk into current virtual-stores to shop, but also into past stores. Imagine not only being able to 3-D print a custom Number One Sack Suit or a "real" Brooks oxford button-down, but being able to basically step into a time machine and walk into Brooks as it existed in, say, 1920, having exactly the same experience you would've had then (except for the goods being nearly free), then exiting the store not onto Madison Avenue, but back into 2035 (or whenever) as your 3-D printer prints your better-than-authentic (because they're 100% custom) 1920 Brooks clothes. 




 
What a time to be alive! 

Given the choice between experiencing Brooks Brothers in 1920, or experiencing it served with a full dose of modern technology and modern medicine, I'll take the latter, thank you very much.  

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Spring and Summer Are Coming

I hate hot weather, but this is the time of the year when I begin to think of of things like seersucker, cotton, linen, straw hats and white bucks. Is your summer wardrobe ready?

 























Richard Press in a seersucker suit at J. Press in the summer of 1968, via his Twitter page. (Also check out his book, Rebel Without A Suit.)  

Sunday, January 1, 2017

Link: When should you take your Christmas decorations down?

Welcome to 2017. I hope we all have a great year.

I always dread all through the Christmas season how barren the house will look at first when the decorations come down in January. But, of course, down they must come; this article has a lot of fascinating information about the history of when various cultures around the world take down their decorations. 

PS:

See my January 2015 article on post-Christmas winter decorating.